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Meet the MQM Faculty & Staff

Robert Floden
Ph.D., Stanford University
floden@msu.edu
http://education.msu.edu/dean/floden-cv.doc
Robert Floden is dean of the College of Education. Floden is also a University Distinguished Professor of teacher education, measurement and quantitative methods, mathematics education, educational psychology and educational policy. He has studied teacher education and other influences on teaching and learning, including work on the cultures of teaching, teacher development, the character and effects of teacher education and how policy is linked to classroom practice. He is a member of the National Academy of Education, for which he serves as Secretary-Treasurer. He is co-editor of the Journal of Teacher Education and serves on the Board of Directors for the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education.
Kenneth Frank
Ph.D., University of Chicago
kenfrank@msu.edu
Kenneth Frank received his Ph.D. in measurement, evaluation and statistical analysis from the School of Education at the University of Chicago in 1993. He is MSU Foundation professor of sociometrics, professor in Counseling, Educational Psychology and Special Education; and adjunct (by courtesy) in Fisheries and Wildlife and Sociology at Michigan State University. His substantive interests include the study of schools as organizations, social structures of students and teachers and school decision-making, and social capital. His substantive areas are linked to several methodological interests: social network analysis, sensitivity analysis and causal inference (konfound-it.com), and multi-level models. His publications include quantitative methods for representing relations among actors in a social network, robustness indices for sensitivity analysis for causal inferences, and the effects of social capital in schools, natural resource management, and other social contexts. Dr. Frank’s current projects include how beginning teachers’ networks affect their response to the Common Core; how schools respond to increases in core curricular requirements; school governance; teachers’ use of social media; implementation of the Carbon Time science curriculum; epistemic network analysis; social network intervention in natural resources and construction management; complex decision-making in health care; and the diffusion of knowledge about climate change.
Spyros Konstantopoulos
Ph.D., University of Chicago
spyros@msu.edu
Spyros Konstantopoulos is a professor of measurement and quantitative methods. His methodological work involves applications of multilevel models in the design of experimental or non-experimental studies and focuses on power analysis in designs with complicated nested structures. His substantive work encompasses research on the effects of educational interventions such as class size, school and teacher effects, and the social distribution of academic achievement.
Kimberly Maier
Ph.D., University of Chicago
kmaier@msu.edu
Kimberly Maier is an associate professor of measurement and quantitative methods who is interested in the development of statistical models for complex data structures. Her current research focuses on the application of multilevel item response theory to educational achievement measures and attitudinal surveys. Other areas of interest include Bayesian data analysis methods for educational research, the study of family impacts on adolescent achievement and aspirations, adolescent motivation in science and mathematics education, and the application of multilevel models to policy research.
Tenko Raykov
Ph.D., Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany
raykov@msu.edu
Tenko Raykov is a professor of measurement and quantitative methods. He specializes in statistical and mathematical modeling of behavioral phenomena, educational and behavioral measurement, and modeling of developmental processes. He is involved in research on evaluation of behavioral measurement reliability and validity, instrument construction and development, analyses of data sets with missing values, and applications of latent variable modeling to behavioral development across the life span.
Edward Roeber
Ph.D., University of Michigan
roeber@msu.edu
Ed Roeber is a professor of education with specialization in measurement and quantitative methods. His research interests include the development of high-quality student assessment systems at the state and local levels; the use of student assessment results to improve student achievement and district instructional programs; the development of balanced assessment systems that include formative assessments, interim benchmark assessments and summative assessments; and assessment of English language learners and students with disabilities.
William Schmidt
Ph.D., University of Chicago
bschmidt@msu.edu
William Schmidt is a University Distinguished Professor, founder and director of the Center for the Study of Curriculum Policy, and co-director of the Education Policy Center. He holds faculty appointments in Measurement and Quantitative Methods and the Department of Statistics. He is a member of the National Academy of Education, an American Educational Research Association (AERA) Fellow, director of the AERA Institute on Statistical Analysis, and a OECD Thomas J. Alexander Fellow for education quality and equity. He has published in numerous journals including the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Education Researcher, Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, American Affairs Journal, Journal of Educational Statistics, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Journal of Curriculum Studies, and the Journal of Educational Measurement. His most recent books include "Why Schools Matter," "Inequality for All," and "Schooling Across the Globe: What We Have Learned from Sixty Years of Mathematics and Science International Assessments." His current writing and research focuses on issues of academic content in K-12 schooling, the effects of curriculum on academic achievement, assessment, and educational policy related to mathematics, science, and testing in general.
Barbara Schneider
Ph.D., Northwestern University
bschneid@msu.edu
Barbara Schneider is the John A. Hannah University Distinguished Professor in the College of Education and the Department of Sociology. She uses a sociological lens to understand societal conditions and interpersonal interactions that create norms and values for enhancing human and social capital. Her research focuses on how the social contexts of schools and families influence the academic and social well-being of adolescents as they move into adulthood. In her career, Schneider has also played a significant role in the development of research methods for the real- time measurement of learning experiences. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the National Academy of Education, the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and, most recently, was elected to the Finnish Academy of Science and Letters. In 2017, she received an Honorary Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Helsinki. Schneider is the principal investigator of the College Ambition Program (CAP), a study that tests a model for promoting a STEM college-going culture in high schools that encourages adolescents to pursue STEM majors in college and in their careers. She is also the principal investigator of Crafting Engagement in Science Environments, an international high school study that tests the impact of Project Based Learning on student academic, social and emotional factors in science classes. Professor Schneider has published 15 books and more than 100 articles and reports on family, social contexts of schooling and sociology of knowledge.